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Black Panther

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Black Panther

https://todateen.com.br/pantera-negra-empoderamento-negro-cinema/

https://todateen.com.br/pantera-negra-empoderamento-negro-cinema/

https://todateen.com.br/pantera-negra-empoderamento-negro-cinema/

Rosine Nibishaka, Opinion Writer

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Black Panther is not only a movie to the African-American community– it is a cultural phenomenon. The movie itself is amazing, but what’s even better is the positive representation that the movie brought to many black communities. For far too long, black people in many movies have been portrayed as drug dealers, uneducated, and gang members. Black children grow up not ever seeing a black superhero on the screen, but that all just changed.

Black Panther celebrates African culture– the possible culture of a continent never contaminated by colonialism. Many times, Africa is portrayed as a  continent that is savage, living in poverty, and famine stricken in the news and many films. The way Black Panther portrayed the imagined Wakanda is so exhilarating. The racing trains, spaceships and vibranium-powered skyscrapers, show us that Africa is not just images that are painted into our heads– it is not all poverty. There is beauty to it and for some reason. we all seem to avoid it.

When Black Panther came out I was most excited about the African women who were playing such empowering roles. The women play a big part in the Wakanda community. The king’s forces were made up of strong women who weren’t afraid of anything, they were fierce, and T’Challa surrounding himself with such opinionated and tough women was a way for young African girls to see representation that didn’t portray black women in negative ways. The best thing about it was they weren’t serious all the time either, which helped to show good characteristics of women instead of them being portrayed as catty. Making sure that this movie was a true representation of the African- American culture was really important for Marvel. They accomplished this by making sure that the film director was black and so was nearly the entire cast, because you can’t have a white director and expect the movie to have the same diversity and representation that the movie had. My favorite part was seeing all of the beautiful costumes that the movie had borrowed from multiple African cultures. Let’s not forget about the amazing music that had nothing but truth to it the whole time. Kendrick Lamar was in charge of the sound track and he did a fantastic job. My favorite song from the album was “Pray For Me” by Lamar and The Weeknd. The song is about justice, loyalty, and heart.

Wakanda is the perfect example of what Africa could have been if the first  African slaves weren’t brought ashore in the British colony of Jamestown, Virginia. Six to seven million black slaves were brought to the New World during the 18th and 19th century and because of that, it was depriving the African Continent of some of its smartest and healthiest women and men. Slavery has denied Africans the opportunity to push themselves to their full potential, or find out what they were capable of, because they have a horrible past that will be with them forever. They were never given the chance to do something amazing with their lives because they weren’t considered humans due to their skin color.  Enslaved people could not legally get married in the American colony because they were considered to be property that belonged to white people.

Black Panther did not disappoint in any way including the culture references. Nowadays people only talk about black history as being slaves. But every part about Black Panther showed what the African culture could have been. Black Panther has also had a huge impact on African children because now they have a superhero who they can relate to. This is why Black Panther is a cultural phenomenon.  

     #WakandaForever

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Rosine Nibishaka, Opinion Writer

Rosine Nibishaka is a 14 year old girl, she lives in Utah and Attends East High School. She was born in Zambia raised by a single mother. Her mother had...

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